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I have to agree with you. At least in my experience this seems true (with a few exceptions). I feel that devs that rely on auto-complete and such of an IDE are never really forced to know the libraries and code they're using. To me it feels like training wheels they never take off, and therefore can never move at full speed. But maybe it's just that due to the popularity of these IDEs, many newer devs are using them while older, more experienced devs are still using what they're used to.

Quick edit: I work with some junior devs who all use IDEs. It pains me when I ask them where some code is and they only give me the filename and not the full path. I guess this is because that is what is most prominent in the IDE.


> It pains me when I ask them where some code is and they only give me the filename and not the full path.

This one clearly is a self-inflicted wound.


Yep, and I'm guessing there are also groups of emoji that work the same when merged with another emoji. For example, I think any monkey emoji + bread gives monkey bread.

Can't you usually just put quotes around the filename and/or path to prevent all those issues?

Edit: nope, just tried it and scp still sees the quoted filename as a host + path


That is just lazy programming. If the input "foo:bar" is ambiguous, the program should try both interpretations (HOST:FILE and FILE) and then present the user with a prompt that provides sufficient information.

"Does foo:bar refer to the local file `foo:bar' (size: 102kB, date: 2021-11-11) or to the file `bar' on host `foo' (FQDN: foo.example.com, IP address: 1.2.3.4)?

1: local file `foo:bar'

2: file `bar' on remote host `foo'

Your selection: "


I agree it sounds like an ad. A quick search found this however: https://joelx.com/how-to-beat-a-patent-troll-in-east-texas/1... which makes me think it's legit. Weird it's almost verbatim from the blog post, but hey why bother spending time on a new write-up I guess.


My apologies for my writing style, I guess my years in SEO have had a strong effect!

I'm extremely grateful for the work Amit did for me, he did not compensate me or even request that I post this for him.

As the original blog post said, patent trolls are predators that rely on the fact that it costs companies over a million dollars to defend a case even if they win so that they can extort tens of thousands of dollars without much work.

We need to abolish the patent system altogether, as everyone on here knows ideas are worthless and execution is everything. The best way to protect real innovators is to prevent artificial monopolies rising up preventing them from competing in the market.


Another comment of author is also their another blog post.


I wonder if he's trying to "control the narrative" in the hopes that he (or the state) isn't sued for releasing private teachers' data to the public.


Also, there sometimes isn't a good separation between the browser and the page itself. For example, I use a dark theme on my browser and was on a site that had a dark nav bar above their logo. They also had another navigation area, so I didn't even notice the top nav bar. I couldn't figure out how to log out of the site due to that.


Anecdotal but I've heard from friends about scheduling (and other) issues with SWA. And when I flew SWA two months ago they had to put me in a hotel for a night due to a 6 hour late flight making me miss my connection. So yeah I'm guessing it's really what they say it is.


If a pizzaria wants business, it makes sense for them to advertise and have a way for people to find them. There are many alternatives to Facebook to help businesses do that, just like there are many ad agencies for them to use to get their ads on radio and TV. Business of course want to keep costs low and FB is (AFAIK) "free" to get started on. But once they get on FB, don't they still need to expand their reach by using Facebook ads? Or is just having a page enough? (I don't use FB so I'm clueless how that works)


This is the real value proposition, Ben Thompson has a lot of good articles on the good and bad of Facebook. Radio and TV ads are expensive because they can only serve one ad spot at a time. Plus, my understanding from friends in advertising is that TV spots can become quite expensive as demand rises. You can get books which tell you roughly the cost of advertising for all different types of media.

Whereas at a single point in time, Facebook can sell many ad spots and allow individuals to target certain groups of people. Unsurprisingly, media thinks you can do very specific ad targeting but you can’t.. not to the level of doomsday-ness that people suggest. They’ve put limits on the min # of people you can target.

It is worth mentioning that FB’s ad bidding system is completely automated, so prices are almost entirely determined by demand and ad spots.

The other side is that, pizza business is not in the business of making a website or dealing with technology. They are in the business of managing a restaurant which is hard work. Anything that takes away technology work can be a huge plus for them, especially if they don’t have to manage it.

When I worked in a restaurant, it would be 12-14 hour shifts. Leadership would do those shifts nearly every single day putting out (non-literal) fires and keeping the ship afloat. You have to pick your battles carefully when running restaurant.

I find it painful when people say.. let’s just go back to the old form of advertising. Old form of advertising highly favored large conglomerates, because the ad spots were limited. Instead businesses had to rely on word of mouth.

But what if you are a small internet business making niche jewelry or whatever? Well, if you only rely on word of mouth you will probably saturate your customer base early. Instead if you could put out ads for your demographic cheaply across your entire country, now you are talking!

Does that mean FB is net good? I think that is up to the individual, I’m not going to tell people otherwise. But there is value there, and everyone should recognize that even if they don’t believe it is net good.


The author spent some time explaining the need to have a reliable laptop and spending $150 for 24-hour service and having two Powerbooks at once. But there was no mention of anything about reliability and repairs (well, replacement parts) for the Framework. I'm curious if he plans to keep a second Framework laptop in case parts are sold out, take too long to ship, etc.


He might have to. As far as I can tell they haven’t even started selling individual parts yet. They all just say “Coming soon” on the website. I’m not sure what they are waiting for.


My guess is that they are using up all their manufacturing capacity to sell new full laptops (and DIY kits). Their current manufacturing setup seems to be that they periodically batch a bunch of what are essentially pre-orders and then get things manufactured after the fact.

Once they're more established and have money in the bank (hopefully that happens), they can think about ramping up manufacturing and actually keeping inventory before it's been spoken for.

Until then, at least the commodity parts (RAM, storage, WiFi card) can be replaced with off-the-shelf parts bought from NewEgg or wherever.


The "Posts" nav item has a dropdown that overlays the document and is still completely flat.


There is a drop shadow on the posts nav item: https://i.imgur.com/dY408DK.png


The dropdown has a shadow for me with Chrome (and also a sound effect).


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